Municipality of Amsterdam - Knowledge Hub | Circle Lab
Municipality of Amsterdam
Municipality of Amsterdam
https://www.amsterdam.nl/en/
Case studies and reports

Last Updated September 20, 2021

Circular district Buiksloterham

The city of Amsterdam is facilitating and suporting the development of a previously industrial region in Amsterdam Noord, into a sustainable and circular district. The instruments with which the municipality wants to fulfill its sustainability ambition includes: free energy advice, land issue, layout of public space, mobility, financing and collaboration.

Policy case

Amsterdam

Last Updated October 5, 2021

Adoption of Puccini Method for Sustainability standards and Sustainable Procurement in Amsterdam

The municipality of Amsterdam introduced the Puccini Method as a framework for the design of public spaces in Amsterdam.The city designs all its streets, squares and public gardens with it. The method has adopted a set of sustainability standards. Following the Puccini Method, any procurement should adopt at least the Piano sustainability criteria.The Puccini method stands for a high-quality, physical layout of the public space. A design that is user-friendly, accessible, safe, manageable, sustainable, affordable, coherent and beautiful.This standard for the Amsterdam street scene consists of a policy framework and 2 technical manuals.The Puccini Method Policy Framework is based on 5 beliefs:- the user benefits from simplicity and obviousness- craft at every scale level- durability- best practices and innovation- collaboration

Policy case

Amsterdam

Last Updated October 4, 2021

Amsterdam's Circular Innovation programme

The Circular Innovation Program 2016-2018 provides insight into the most important innovation projects and developments in the city in the field of Circular Economy and the way the City of Amsterdam anticipates it. The programme contains a framework of innovation processes.

Policy case

Amsterdam

Last Updated January 28, 2021

Improved separate sewer system at Erasmusgracht

In Amsterdam, a decentralised alternative has been developed for an improved separate sewer system. That alternative is not only cheaper; the cleaner effluent means that it is also better. In the project on Erasmusgracht, rainwater is discharged into a separate sedimentation reservoir in the canal, after which it passes through the helophyte filter. It is subsequently discharged into the canal. The pilot project shows that the effluent from the sedimentation reservoir alone is better than that of improved separate sewers. In the sedimentation section, suspended particles settle, with the heavy metals bound to them. The subsequent treatment in the helophyte filter further improves the quality of the effluent. The helophyte filter serves primarily to remove the organic nutrients nitrogen and phosphates from the water. The two oval helophyte filters seal the sedimentation reservoir off from Erasmusgracht. The helophyte filters are lined by rock-filled gabions. The helophyte filters are open to the public and a bench has been placed by them. A sign on the bank explains the purpose and workings of the system.

Business case

Last Updated October 4, 2021

A policy for green spaces in Amsterdam

Aside from preserving the last remaining natural places, we need to create new ones—especially in cities. Amsterdam is making its first steps in this direction. The Structural Vision Amsterdam 2040 sets out the City of Amsterdam’s strategy in relation to green space. The Green Vision 2020-2050 outlines what the City will do until 2050 to become a greener city. Although the relationship between biodiversity and the circular economy is not entirely clear cut, it is becoming increasingly clear how circularity can be integrated in many of the solutions based, derived, and inspired by nature to upscale environmental, economic and social benefits. Amstedam is focusing on green space. The focus of the city's vision for green spaces is on parks, connections and accessibility, forest management, climate proofing and biodiversity and neighbourhood green space. Parks and forests, such as the Amsterdam Forest (Amsterdamse Bos), with its unique combination of park, woodland, water and nature, should be used less intensively, maintained more frequently and be better connected and accessible to increase their value to the community. Green roofs are the ideal setting for circualr nature-based solutions that can absorb, store, filter and purify rainwater, in turn reducing flood risks and slow down the run-off into the street, transforming urban vegetated spaces into vibrant centres for the community, all while increasing climate proofing and biodiversity. In addition, when temperatures are high, green space has a cooling effect produced by evaporation. Finally, the city encourages residents to work on green space themselves, and provides subsidy where possible, for example for the planting of wall gardens (a narrow border for plants along the front of a house or apartment building), green façades or roof gardens, to grow vegetables or increase the neighbourhood green space.

Policy case

Amsterdam

Last Updated October 5, 2021

CTO Office Start-up in residence

Startup in Residence is an initiative of StartupAmsterdam and the Chief Technology Office (CTO) of the City of Amsterdam. The programme connects startups with key social challenges in Amsterdam. Founded in Amsterdam in 2015, the programme invites both Dutch and international entrepreneurs to tackle these challenges in collaboration with the local government. Their innovative solutions impact the City as well as its citizens.Most solutions incorporate circularity elements, such as supporting green and efficient deliveries or developing a procurable circular textiles product.The Programme offers startups an intensive training programme, as well as the support of professional coaches or mentors. The startups will also be provided with working space and have access to the municipality’s network.

Policy case

Amsterdam

Last Updated November 24, 2021

Flexible zoning plan for the Amsterdam city-port area

The municipality of Amsterdam introduced a flexible zoning law for the area neighbouring the port, so as to increase the flexibility of building functions and counteract structural vacancy. The broadened scope can also be used to include more matters in the zoning plan than is possible under regular legislation, such as natural gas-free developments. Such flexible zoning designations can support the experimentation in and development of a circular economy.

Policy case

Amsterdam

Last Updated January 28, 2021

Schoonschip floating neighbourhood

Amsterdam experiences a major housing crisis, to a large extent due to a lack of buildable space in the city. One of the solutions to address this crisis is the "floating neighbourhood" Schoonschip, consisting of 46 houses swimming on the IJ river. Schoonschip will have completely local energy sourcing with solar panels and heat pumps, a third of houses will have rooftop gardens, and waste water is recycled to water plants and create gas and fertiliser through a floating biorefinery. The neighbourhood was in planning since 2010, and the first seven boats arrived in late 2018.

Business case

Last Updated October 7, 2021

Improving the efficiency of composting with worms

Worm hotels can be a good way for the city of Amsterdam to deal with its biotrash on a decentralised basis. However, their implementation is somewhat hampered by efficiency problems due to the speed of the composting process, and the risk of climate bringing harm to the worms. The Foundation Buurtcompost and the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences have developed a solution to this: a better worm hotel. It is situated underground, with the earth shielding the worms from climate, and equipped with a shredded that allows for more effective composting. The collaboration has also sparked a large amount of further research by the AUAS, ranging from the quality of compost to the social effect of neighbourhood worm hotels.

Business case

Amsterdam

Last Updated January 28, 2021

Madaster and Amsterdam Metropolitan Area

Madaster, a circular construction organisation that aims to ‘make materials available forever by giving them an identity’, has partnered with the Amsterdam Metropolitan Area to initiate a materials passports pilot project. The enterprise strives to create value in materials used for construction—an industry characterised by excessive waste generation—and ultimately stimulate circular construction in the region. Madaster serves as a public, digital platform that catalogues the products and materials used in a building, thus creating documented ‘storage units’ of materials that are easy to recover and reuse. Circular and financial information flows are also linked, which records past, present and future values of such materials. So far under the project, eight Amsterdam municipalities have been awarded certificates for their implementation of materials passports.

Business case

Amsterdam

Last Updated October 20, 2022

Amsterdam Circular Strategy 2020-2025

The Amsterdam Circular Strategy 2020-2025 outlines how the City of Amsterdam aims to achieve its ambition to become 50% circular by 2030 and to achieve a fully circular city by 2050. The strategy focuses on three value chains: food and organic waste streams; consumer goods and the built environment and details ambitions and courses of action for each.

Policy case

Amsterdam

Last Updated September 13, 2021

City of Amsterdam rewards organic waste returns with compost!

Amsterdam offers a free 20L bag of compost made from local green waste to citizens who return green waste to local bulky points for a limited period, as part of the celebrations for the city's National Compost Day. The free compost is a thank you for the effort made by Amsterdammers to offer organic waste and green waste separately.

Policy case

Amsterdam

Last Updated October 4, 2021

Amsterdam's Long-Term Bicycle Plan to improve cycling infrastructure

Amsterdam is implementing the Long-Term Bicycle Plan 2017-2022, which aims to make biking safer and more convenient by improving infrastructure (paths, bike parking) and reducing speed limits for cars.

Policy case

Amsterdam

Last Updated December 5, 2021

eHUBS: Smart Shared Green Mobility Hubs piloted in European Cities

eHUBS are on-street locations that bring together e-bikes, e-cargo bikes, e-scooters and/or e-cars, offering users a wide range of options to experiment and use in various situations. The idea is to give an high-quality and diverse offer of shared electric mobility services to dissuade citizens from owning private cars, resulting in cleaner, more liveable and pleasant cities.eHUBS draws on a wide range of multidisciplinary expertise. The 15-partner consortium, led by the City of Amsterdam, will run until 2021 and is composed of European cities, network organisations, shared e-mobility service providers, and universities.

Policy case

Amsterdam , 8+ More

Last Updated December 5, 2021

Green bus shelters in Amsterdam

When you cycle through Amsterdam, you come across plenty of green roofs and green façades. But green tram stops? That’s a novelty. Tram shelters are increasingly being clad in greenery. Some of them across the city have a green roof and a green wall. These bus stops have their own irrigation system that uses rainwater. Underground there is a pump room where rainwater is collected. This rainwater is used to water the plants completely automatically. Green roofs on bus stops in Amsterdam are demonstrating how functional design can be combined with nature based solutions to improve biodiversity.

Policy case

Amsterdam

Last Updated January 11, 2022

Converting urine into fertilizer: Amsterdam starts Green Urine campaign

Amsterdam water authorities have reportedly planned to collect urine and utilizing it for phosphate fertilizer. The campaign has been called 'Green Urine Campaign'. As collection site, the campaign uses outdoor urinals in Amsterdam's La Place de la Bourse. The tagline on the outdoor urinals reads: "Is our wastewater actually a goldmine?". Urine is then collected by the city's water company, Waternet.The campaign also aims to raise awareness about the benefits of recycling urine, about waste reduction and about the prospect of using urine for agricultural use since it contains mineral phosphorus.Urine can be used directly on plants when diluted with water, providing nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. However, using human waste as fertilizer is considered a taboo in many parts of the world. Waternet hopes to process what it gleans into an upcycled fertilizer for public gardens and vegetated rooftops around the city. Farmers generally use mined phosphate to fertilize crops and to provide this vital nutrient. Since scientists believe that phosphate resources will run out in 50-100 years, converting urine into fertilizer rich in phosphate might produce a new revenue stream for Amsterdam and beyond.

Policy case

Amsterdam

Approved by curator

Last Updated September 27, 2022

The Denim Deal - an alliance of international frontrunners

Together with actors from public and private institutions and organisations, the city of Amsterdam set the joint goal to make the denim supply chain more sustainable. During their participation at the REFLOW project, they formed the Denim Deal, an international alliance of more than 40 partners working to make post-consumer recycling of textiles the standard in the industry.

Business case

Amsterdam

Last Updated September 27, 2022

REFLOW

REFLOW was an EU Horizon 2020 innovation action project running from 2019 to 2022, with the aim to increase circularity in European cities. Through REFLOW, the 28 project partners developed a range of solutions to make the material flows more circular within the six pilot cities of Amsterdam, Berlin, Milan, Cluj-Napoca, Paris, and Vejle. The cities' social, environmental, and economic impact was assessed, and a range of solutions enabling the circular transition were developed through active citizen involvement. The project combined the expertise of the project partners spanning municipalities, scientific and research institutions, technology providers, design and grassroot organisations, and small and medium-sized enterprises.

Article / Report

Copenhagen

Last Updated April 21, 2022

The Amsterdam Reflow Booklet

The municipality of Amsterdam, co-created the Amsterdam RELOW Booklet, which describes circular solutions for the textile industry, especially highlighting the aspects of, reuse, repair, refurbish and second-hand in the local context of the city. To illustrate how the pilot envisions moving from a linear to a circular textile flow, the municipality of Amsterdam co-developed the “Textile Wheel,” an infographic identifying the 16 strategic stages of circular textiles, which are described in the booklet. While working on an overarching roadmap for the upcoming years, the municipality of Amsterdam co-defined the following major focus points: The amount of correctly collected textiles needs to be increased, and incineration should be avoided (without people buying and trashing more) to provide feedstock for the recycling industry and products that contain recycled fibres. Use the increase of correctly discarded and collected textile to further design and operationalise the wheel involving different stakeholders of each step of the ‘Textile Wheel’, bringing supply and demand together. Discarding less and extending the life cycle of textiles by repairing, reusing and revaluing through a series of workshops and collaboration with educational institutes. Exploring design for circularity and circular textiles through a series of workshops and public activities.The publisher aim to assemble knowledge and educate stakeholders at every stage of the textile industry’s cycle. Firstly, they aim to extend the life of textiles currently in use through encouraging people to reduce consumption and repair or reuse items. Secondly, when items must be discarded, they want to encourage people to do so correctly and responsibly. Finally, the aim is to educate and encourage citizens, designers, retailers, and manufacturers to think sustainably when creating or buying new products. In a nutshell, the Amsterdam Reflow Booklet rethinks the lifecycle of textiles with citizens and stakeholders. The Amsterdam Reflow Booklet addresses the environmental impact of the textile industry through a grassroots initiative focusing on discarded consumer textiles in a municipal context.You can find the full Amsterdam Reflow Booklet following the link below.

Article / Report

Amsterdam

Approved by curator

Last Updated June 6, 2022

Europe’s largest commercial energy storage system using EV batteries provides sustainable energy for stadium events

A massive energy storage system that includes new and used electric vehicle (EV) batteries was built at Amsterdam’s Johan Cruijff Arena, the home of the Dutch football club Ajax.

Business case

Amsterdam